Thursday, March 07, 2019

No, Democrats Aren't Anti-Israel



Here's the thing people like New York Times columnist Bret Stephens don't seem to get: Rep. Ilhan Omar has been soundly criticized and forced to apologize for her words -- the worst of which were in old tweets. That's not exactly letting her off the hook. And it's a lot more than we can say for the endless line of lawmakers who have said equally offensive things -- on the House and Senate floor! -- about blacks, gays, trans people, Hispanics, women and so on. But you know what's a lot worse than inflammatory words and an insincere apology? (Ask "Barney Fag" about those.) Actual policies to discriminate against said groups, like the stream of racist voter-suppression laws that have gone on the books since the Voting Rights Act was gutted; recent legislation designed to chip away at newly gained LGBTQ marriage rights and our ability to adopt children; and the constant legislative attack on women's right to choose. What anti-Semitic laws have anyone proposed let alone enacted? 

As for the people who are less critical of Rep. Omar, they are asking two things: Are we sure you're not using her as a smokescreen to not address the horrendous policies of Trump pal Benjamin Netanyahu? (I’m sorry, but you don’t have to be a rightwing zealot with all that entails to be pro Israel.) And above all, what is it about Rep. Omar -- as opposed to Steve King, Dick Armey and all of the other ones -- that she's being held to such a higher standard of reprimand than critics of other groups? Gee, I wonder ...

P.S. Speaker Pelosi seems determined to forge ahead with this resolution condemning anti-Semitism and bigotry -- all part of Dems' master plan to self-destruct in time for the 2020 election. Stephens writes, "if Pelosi can’t muster a powerful and unequivocal resolution condemning anti-Semitism, then Omar will have secured her political future and won a critical battle for the soul of the Democratic Party. At that point, the days when American Jews can live comfortably within the Democratic fold will be numbered" to which I say -- once I stop laughing: Does anyone really believe this nonsense at all?


OK, fine. Now can this stupidity please go away?

7 comments:

Rix said...

How criticism of a government became being anti anything, especially a religion, was one cool political trick.

Ottawa said...

Omar knows exactly what she’s doing and the excuses need to end, as does the whataboutery of people like you. And the standard that you claim to use - is anyone pushing bigoted legislation - is ridiculous. Does Omar have to call for Jews to be rounded up for you to understand that she’s deliberately using anti-Semitic language and imagery as political tools? I have never heard anyone say that criticism of Israel is illegitimate. Israelis criticize their own government more than anyone else. I have only heard that language (“they won’t allow criticism of Israel”) come from bigots who cross the line into clear anti-Semitism, as Omar has. As a left political activist since the age of 17, it’s truly awful to see the pseudo-left fall for such outrageous bigotry. There’s a lot of information out there on this kind of thing - read it if you want to have a credible opinion.

Kenneth M. Walsh said...

@Ottawa: You're still not addressing why Omar is being held to an entirely different standard than every other lawmaker -- and it's obvious why you aren't.

Dan said...

All anti-Semites are anti-Israeli, but not all anti-Israelis are anti-Semites. As a Jewish American with single-issue-Israel voter parents, i know full well you're not allowed to breathe a wisp of criticism of Israel, the way you could openly malign any other country. I also know few countries (and communities) face the unbridled

simon simon said...

The media criticized the Chinese government all the time. No Chinese American would or should be offended.

barryearle said...

I am Jewish. I have visited Israel. I think what was created out of the desert is breathtaking. However, the longing for a Jewish state that was central to the Jewish faith--"Next year in Jerusalem" that ends the Passover Seder--was destroyed when Israel was formed after World War II. Next year means in the future.

Looking to the future is central to the faith as in the hope at Yom Kippur every year that we will do better next year than we did this year. The concept of Tikum Olam--that we will work to finish the world that has been left in an incomplete state--is something that each generation must work at because it will never be completed. But we still look to the future as if maybe soon it will be completed, that my actions will make a difference.

After many years I find myself saying that the creation of Israel was a mistake. We should be still longing for it and it should never come into existence. I understand the post-Holocaust urge to create Israel, but in doing so the longing for a Jewish homeland has not brought the world something better. We are still left with Tikum Olam. And if anything shows how nearly insurmountable completing the world truly is, one need look no further than what the creation of Israel has wrought.

Zachary Sigler said...

Criticizing government tactics does not equate to being anti any religion. Also, while we're discussing Israel, they build lots of walls. That doesn't seem to have solved any problems.

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